Mern (a location otherwise unidentified). The book's heroine is an "honest and industrious" goat-girl named Mandy, who grazes her flock on the slopes of Mt. Mandy's silver hammer, though, proves to be magic; striking it calls forth a helpful purple elf. The domain is ruled by an evil and ambitious tyrant called the Wizard Wutz. They are outraged at the intrusion of such an outlandish figure — for Mandy has seven arms and hands. [2] The novel, in contrast, clearly indicates that Mandy, despite her inanimate parts, comes from a race of seven-handed people. Nowhere close to the charm, magic, and inventiveness of the originals. Wutz's machinations begin to work. Mandy accidentally liberates Ruggedo from the jug. When a clue indicates that King Kerry can be found at a place called the Silver Mountain, the enterprising Mandy leads Nox on a search for the missing monarch. It is one of Thompson's final five Oz books in the Famous Forty which failed to have its copyright renewed, thus becoming public domain. Handy Mandy brings then and fantasy back that I feel was somewhat lacking in the previous book (Captain Salt in Oz). Mandy herself is pretty unique in the Oz canon, she's the main protagonist in a RPT Oz book but is female and not created originally by Baum, she's appears to be if not adult then considerable older than usual leads, plus is not conventionally human what with having seven arms, of course this being a Thomson book Mandy is given a loyal animal companion in this case the Royal Ox Nox. (This is the last appearance of Ruggedo the Gnome King in the "Famous Forty" Oz books, though he does re-appear in the works of later Oz authors.). A doorway hidden under a waterfall leads them to a subterranean world under the Silver Mountain. by Wonder Publishing. Kerry is restored to his throne. As part of his plan, Wutz keeps Kerry prisoner, and has obtained the jug that is the confinement vessel of Ruggedo the Gnome King (he was transformed into a jug at the end of Thompson's Pirates in Oz). Once there she encounters the Royal Ox of Kereteria who has been puzzling over a mystery for the past two years regarding the location of the young King Kerry who vanished one day while hunting. Ruth Plumly Thompson Handy Mandy brings then and fantasy back that I feel was somewhat lacking in the previous book (Captain Salt in Oz). All in all a fun and fast paced read that fits the Oz mythos well. Welcome back. Mandy accidentally liberates Ruggedo, merely by breaking his jug. Mandy the seven-armed (you heard me) goatherd--which sounds Swiss in spite of her Dutch cap--is a no-nonsense heroine who, when in doubt, sets to the work that is closest to hand. This time she brings in Mandy the seven armed goat herder from Mount Mern, who has been brought to Oz quite suddenly by a powerful erruption. In the poem, Mandy is an artificially created being, built by Sir Solomon Tremendous Wise, made of "wood and tin...wire and cloth and plaster...." She was built as a sort of domestic robot to perform housework. The two soon embark on a journey to find the young ruler and are eventually entangled in a would be conquerer's plot to overtake all of Oz. Like all of her books, it was illustrated by John R. Neill. Reilly & Lee With hammer and elf, blue daisy, and Nox's horns, they have enough magic to escape confinement, find and rescue King Kerry, and reach Ozma's Palace in time to frustrate Wutz and Ruggedo. Mandy herself is pretty unique in the Oz canon, she's the main protagonist in a RPT Oz book but is female and not created originally by Baum, she's appears to be if not adult then considerable older than usual leads, plus is not conventionally human what with having seven arms, of course this being a Thomson book Mandy is given a loyal animal companion in this case the Royal Ox Nox. Mandy finds a silver hammer, and meets a white ox with golden horns; she blunders into the court of King Kerr of Keretaria and his courtiers. They swim rivers (Mandy can't swim) and survive a flood on their way to the Gillikin Country. Mandy and Nox learn that old King Kerr is one of Wutz' agents and that Wutz is holding the rightful King Kerry prisoner. Nathan DeHoff devoted one of his Oz stories to Handy Mandy. These books should not be considered Oz canon. When a clue indicates that King Kerry can be found at a place called the Silver Mountain, the enterprising Mandy leads Nox on a search for the missing monarch. Ruggedo's appearance here is his final role in the "Famous Forty" Oz books — though he returns in the works of later Oz authors. While fun, I do wish more of Wutz's plot had been fleshed out and that some of his other stolen prizes were revealed. Handy Mandy, however, is a triumphant realization of a unique figure. The elf, who calls himself Himself, transforms the two villains into potted cacti. Mern, everyone has seven hands. The poem was published in Oz-story Magazine No. In the poem, Mandy is an artificial and created being, made of "wood and tin...wire and cloth and plaster...." She was built as a sort of domestic robot to perform housework. They are outraged by the intrusion of such an outlandish figure — for Mandy has seven arms and hands. A reasonably good Thomson Oz book with quite a few interesting features. Yet their efforts to solve their difficulties are frustrated, since they lack the Magic Picture and Book of Records. Anyway a pleasant enough read not too many irrelevant episodes except the Topsies and the Highlanders, a reasonable new villain in the Wizard Of Wutz, although the Nome King (according to Thompson Gnome King) does make a brief appearance. We’d love your help. I don't know. Refresh and try again. That tendency gets her involved in all kinds of crazy adventures, from flood to explosions to rescuing a kidnapped King and saving Oz from the bad guys. Maybe the fact that the first main character of the Oz books is a little girl indicates that Baum was writing primarily with a female audience in mind? Wutz is plotting to steal the main magical artifacts of Oz, including the Magic Picture and the Great Book of Records, as a prelude to conquest. Ruggedo the Gnome King makes his last appearance in the Oz-Canon of Forty here. Handy Mandy in Oz Mandy is a goat-herder from Mt. For her part, Mandy is amazed to meet so many two-handed people; on Mt. After a month at home on Mt. Mandy discovers that the Royal Ox' horns have magic powers: they can be unscrewed from his head, and when they are, the right horn grants wishes, and his left horn offers clues. Mern everyone has seven hands. A reasonably good Thomson Oz book with quite a few interesting features. Margaret Atwood’s Big Sequel Answers Readers’ Questions. Handy Mandy in Oz is the thirty-first installment in the Oz book series, and the seventeenth Oz novel written by Ruth Plumly Thompson. Wutz and Ruggedo instantly become allies in evil (though deeply mistrustful ones), and together they set off for the Emerald City to complete their conquest.

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